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Time Travel (adult)

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*[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/t?SEARCH=if+i+never+get+back'''If I Never Get Back'''] by Darryl Brock *[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/t?SEARCH=if+i+never+get+back'''If I Never Get Back'''] by Darryl Brock
*[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/X?SEARCH=kindred+butler'''Kindred'''] by Octavia E. Butler *[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/X?SEARCH=kindred+butler'''Kindred'''] by Octavia E. Butler
 +:This wonderful novel is really a "slave narrative." In some ways, its portrait of 19th century America is more frightening than Frederick Douglass', on which it is based, because the events are related by a modern, horrified character, while the slaveowners and even the slaves viewed their lives as "normal." Much of the tension in the story comes from the modern characters "acquiescing" in their roles. The "time paradox" in the story mirrors the readers' experience in any novel: time in the story (the 19th century for the heroine) moves at "normal" speed, while no time at all transpires in her present.
 +
*[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/X?SEARCH=legend+deveraux'''Legend'''] by Jude Deveraux *[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/X?SEARCH=legend+deveraux'''Legend'''] by Jude Deveraux
*[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/t?SEARCH=merchant+prince'''Merchant Prince'''] by Armin Shimerman *[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/t?SEARCH=merchant+prince'''Merchant Prince'''] by Armin Shimerman

Revision as of 15:13, 13 October 2009

Article in Adult Fiction

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This wonderful novel is really a "slave narrative." In some ways, its portrait of 19th century America is more frightening than Frederick Douglass', on which it is based, because the events are related by a modern, horrified character, while the slaveowners and even the slaves viewed their lives as "normal." Much of the tension in the story comes from the modern characters "acquiescing" in their roles. The "time paradox" in the story mirrors the readers' experience in any novel: time in the story (the 19th century for the heroine) moves at "normal" speed, while no time at all transpires in her present.
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