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Bbjoring (Talk | contribs)
(History and Economics moved to History: Only 2 entries now, but expected to expand to the point where 'history' AND 'economics' might both become categories.)
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Bbjoring (Talk | contribs)
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-*[http://166.61/234.92/search/t?SEARCH=worst+hard+time '''The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl'''] by Timothy Egan+Article in [[:Category:Adult Nonfiction]], and [[:Category:Historical]]
-:Pulitzer prize-winning reporter Egan tells the story of the settlement of the southern American plains, how a bill of goods called "dry land farming" was sold to those who came, and how despite the warnings of the cowboys and early explorers, the grassland of the plains, which had protected the soil in this land of desert like dryness for thousands of years, was plowed under in the space of a few years in the rush to capitalize on a boom in wheat prices. In 1929 wheat prices failed with the glut on the market, and then came the predictable long years of drought, when the unrestrained dust rose up and buried the debt ridden farms. Beautifully written history.+
-*[http://166.61.234.92/search/t?SEARCH=the+world+is+flat '''The World is Flat'''] by Thomas L. Friedman+Here are non-fiction accounts of past eras. Books about individual lives are placed in the [[:Category:Biography]]
-:Thomas Friedman clarifies just how the world is truly changing into the oft-discussed ‘global community’. The ‘flattening’ of the world refers to the metaphorical leveling of the playing field as a direct result of the technical advances of the digital revolution. He enables the reader to make sense of the rise of India and China, along with numerous smaller countries that can now take advantage of the political and economic barriers that are falling. It is an insightful and important work, full of anecdotes that bring complex economic theories to life.+ 
 +*[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/t?SEARCH=worst+hard+time '''The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl'''] by Timothy Egan
 +:Pulitzer prize-winning reporter Egan tells the story of the settlement of the southern American plains, how a bill of goods called "dry land farming" was sold to those who came, and how despite the warnings of the cowboys and early explorers, the grassland of the plains, which had protected the soil in this land of desert like dryness for thousands of years, was plowed under in the space of a few years in the rush to capitalize on a boom in wheat prices. In 1929 wheat prices failed with the glut on the market, and then came the predictable long years of drought, when the unrestrained dust rose up and buried the debt ridden farms. Beautifully written history.
 + 
 +*[http://aries.jmrl.org/search/t?SEARCH=first+tycoon '''The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt'''] by T. J. Stiles
 +:"Commodore" Vanderbilt was notoriously tight-lipped, and many of the anecdotes of his life come from testimony during a heated litigation of his will. Stiles bypasses this poisoned well and concentrates instead on the ways by which a steamship and railroad operator helped to create the American corporate world and its financial base:
 +::"Like a ghost, the business enterprise departed the body of the individual proprietor and became a being in itself, a corporation with its own identity, its own character, its own personhood. Over the course of his career, Vanderbilt lived out the history of this abstraction, the invention of this imagined world." (p. 564)
 + 
 + 
 +[[Category:Adult Nonfiction]]
 +[[Category:Historical]]

Current revision

Article in Category:Adult Nonfiction, and Category:Historical

Here are non-fiction accounts of past eras. Books about individual lives are placed in the Category:Biography

Pulitzer prize-winning reporter Egan tells the story of the settlement of the southern American plains, how a bill of goods called "dry land farming" was sold to those who came, and how despite the warnings of the cowboys and early explorers, the grassland of the plains, which had protected the soil in this land of desert like dryness for thousands of years, was plowed under in the space of a few years in the rush to capitalize on a boom in wheat prices. In 1929 wheat prices failed with the glut on the market, and then came the predictable long years of drought, when the unrestrained dust rose up and buried the debt ridden farms. Beautifully written history.
"Commodore" Vanderbilt was notoriously tight-lipped, and many of the anecdotes of his life come from testimony during a heated litigation of his will. Stiles bypasses this poisoned well and concentrates instead on the ways by which a steamship and railroad operator helped to create the American corporate world and its financial base:
"Like a ghost, the business enterprise departed the body of the individual proprietor and became a being in itself, a corporation with its own identity, its own character, its own personhood. Over the course of his career, Vanderbilt lived out the history of this abstraction, the invention of this imagined world." (p. 564)
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