Louisa County Library

Louisa LibraryHours:
Monday - Tuesday: 11am - 7pm
Wednesday - Friday: 10am - 5pm
Saturday: 9am - 4pm
Sunday: 1pm - 5pm

Phone: 540.894.5853
Fax: 540.894.9810
Email Us

Jump to: Adult Programs | Teen Programs | Kids Programs | Volunteer

Programs for Adults

COMPUTER TUTORIALS

computer

 

Would you like help with creating a resume; setting up an email account; searching online databases; installing software on a laptop; making a copy of files or pictures? Meet with a library staff member for up to an hour of one-on-one help using either a public computer at the library or your own laptop. Advance registration is required. Call 540-894-5853 or visit the circulation desk at the library to sign up.

NOON DAY BOOK GROUP

Meets monthly on the 3rd Wednesday of each month from 12-1pm. Refreshments will be provided. Program listings are below.

TUESDAY EVENING BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP

Meets monthly (except for December) on the 4th Tuesday of each month from 7-8:30pm. The group will discuss a wide range of titles chosen by members and enjoy refreshments. Program listings are below.

GED

GED Information Session

June 02, 2015
6:00 pm

Get all of your questions answered at this GED information session. Adult Community Education of Louisa will help you understand what the GED test is like and how to prepare. You will see that no matter how old you are or where you are academically you can succeed. For more information contact tduck@jmrl.org.
No registration required.

Are You a DIY Person?

handcraftB.Y.O.C. - BRING YOUR OWN CRAFT

June 03, 2015
2:00 pm

Do you knit, bead, make rugs, hand stitch or do any kind of handcraft? Come to share ideas, show off your work and get another crafter's eye and perception. Chat and meet your neighbors while you work on your craft. Bring any project you're working on, or come just to be inspired. All ages and levels of experience welcome. Call or visit the library for details.
Meets every Wednesday

Life Planning

necklace.Advance Life Care Planning

June 08, 2015
1:00 pm

Come learn basic information about Wills, Trusts, Powers of Attorney and Advanced Medical Directives. Who needs them? Why or why not?
Guest Speaker: Doris W. Gelbman, Esq.
No registration required.

Noon Day Book Group

book cover1ST TO DIE by James Patterson

June 17, 2015
12:00 pm

Four women--a police detective, an assistant D.A., a reporter, and a medical examiner who call themselves the Women's Murder Club--develop lifelong bonds as they pursue a killer whose twisted imagination has stunned an entire city. Check the Catalog arrow

Future Readings:

Tuesday Evening Book Discussion Group

book coverTHE BOYS IN THE BOAT by Daniel James Brown

June 23, 2015
7:00 pm

Traces the story of an American rowing team from the University of Washington that defeated elite rivals at Hitler's 1936 Berlin Olympics, sharing the experiences of such contributors as their enigmatic coach, a visionary boat builder and a homeless teen rower.
Check the Catalog arrow

In partnership with PVCC

Getting Started at Piedmont Virginia Community College

July 09, 2015
4:00 pm

Denise McClanahan, PVCC Outreach Manager discusses PVCC degrees and certificates (many you can complete in less than two years), resources to help you succeed in the classroom and beyond, PVCC placement tests (receive free practice test materials!) and financial aid opportunities. For more information, contact Denise McClanahan at 434.961.5275 or dmcclanahan@pvcc.edu.
No registration required.

Yoga

Yoga @ Your Library

July 16, 2015
1:00 pm

Join the library for a four week series of 1-hour yoga sessions taught by Donya Bauer. If you have a mat please bring it with you, limited mats will be available for those that donít have them. No registration required.

Tuesday Evening Book Discussion Group

book coverA FALL OF MARIGOLDS by Susan Meissner

July 28, 2015
7:00 pm

Two women living 100 years apart experience similar tragic losses of love, Clara's in the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, and Taryn's in the collapse of the Twin Towers, are connected through time by a scarf.
Check the Catalog arrow

Tuesday Evening Book Discussion Group

book coverA MAN CALLED OVE by Fredrick Backman

August 25, 2015
7:00 pm

A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door.
Check the Catalog arrow

Genealogy Room Exhibit

Arminius Mill

 

A handmade model of the Arminius Mill building, constructed by Michael Dunn, is on exhibit in the library's genealogy room. The original Mill housed steam powered machinery used to process pyrite ore. Pyrite contained the sulfur used to produce sulfuric acid, a component in many chemical processes. Mineral's rich mining history began in 1830 with gold mining and ended around 1921 with the closing of the pyrite mines.

Local Artists on Display

The Italo Scanga Foundation, a nonprofit trust that promotes the visual arts, has funded a permanent exhibit of original art by local artists. Paintings, sculpture, mosaics, quilts and photography are among the media to be displayed. Here is a sampling:
photo
Photographer: Richard Hinde
art
Artist: Janice Breeden

History of Louisa Library

A Branch in a Former Barber Shop

Original Louisa Library
Original Louisa Library

An early attempt to establish a library in Louisa County took place in 1953,when the Virginia State Library delivered books with a van. In 1971, 50 people turned out for a meeting with Raymond Williams, the Director of Jefferson-Madison Regional Library. From this event, a campaign was launched to create a branch in Louisa.

 

Within a year, the dream became reality. The Louisa County Branch Library opened on November 27, 1972, in a former barber shop on Main Street. This 440-square-foot space was rented by the county for $100 a month and was open 22 hours a week with two part-time staff. During the early years an occasional story hour was held in local churches. During the last year in the building, story hours and other children's programs were held in the branch, but due to severe space limitations the library was closed to the public. The library remained in those cramped quarters until October 1979.

More Room for Growth

Former Girl Scout house becomes Louisa Library
Former Girl Scout house becomes Louisa Library

In 1979, Louisa County purchased the charming Girl Scout house on West Street, a 2,252-square-foot building with a 305 square-foot meeting room. This location of the library, was open to the public 48 hours per week and had a staff that included a Branch Manager, 3 full-time and 2 part-time staff. The collection grew from 714 volumes to nearly 30,000 volumes with an annual circulation of over 116,000 items.

 

In 1987, the Louisa County Board of Supervisors created a Library Advisory Board with representatives from each voting district. In October 1988, this Board encouraged the County Supervisors to establish a Library Foundation for the purpose of acquiring a library site and constructing a larger, more modern library building.

A Wonderful New Home

New Louisa Library
New Louisa Library

More than ten years of working, planning and fund-raising resulted in a plan for construction of a new 15,000 square-foot library to be located adjacent to Louisa County Middle and High schools. Plans for the new branch included significantly larger collections, computers with Internet access, a historical and genealogical collection room, a large meeting room, space for tutoring and a law collection.

 

Ground was broken for the new Louisa Library in March 1999, and, on December 12, 1999, the branch was dedicated. Staff and community greeted the opening of the new building and with it, expanded services to the citizens of Louisa County.

 

The Library in the 21st Century

The library has many features of a modern 21st century library with public computers, printers, wireless internet, self checkout, and audiobooks and eBooks to download. The building survived the August 2011 earthquake with little damage, and the staff was able to provide assistance to the Louisa County Schools that sustained extreme damage. Today six school computers remain in the library to give students access to homework assignments.

 

As of 2013, the library houses 60,000 items that include books, books on CD, and DVDs for all ages. A staff of three full time and three part-time employees serve the community with internet tutorials, family film programs, adult and teen book discussion groups, and a wide range of programs for children.